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Thursday, May 25

  1. page Petronius edited ... writer during the Neronian era. He is most famously known for his work Satyricon, a satiri…
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    writer during the Neronian era.
    He is most famously known for his work Satyricon, a satirical comic novel where he mocked former slaves. In one of the more famous scenes "the Banquet of Trimalchio" he mocks the character Trimalchio (a former slave who is said to mirror Nero) by having him throw a lavish dinner party. At this party he serves ridiculous courses including a hog stuffed with sausages and a boiled calf wearing a helmet, served by slaves singing and dancing slaves and reciting his own nonsense poetry, ending the night with an elaborate play of his funeral complete with music and crying guests.
    {http://i.huffpost.com/gadgets/slideshows/321505/slide_321505_3018771_free.jpg} TRIMALCHIO'S DINNER PARTY from the “Satyricon”
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    6:59 am
  2. page Petronius edited {https://db4sgowjqfwig.cloudfront.net/images/577829/Petronius.jpg} Gaius Petronius Arbiter (AKA Ti…
    {https://db4sgowjqfwig.cloudfront.net/images/577829/Petronius.jpg} Gaius Petronius Arbiter (AKA Titus Petronius Niger) was a Roman writer during Neronian era. Born of a noble family he was expected to go into politics and became a governor of a province in Asia and a member of the consul in Rome. His real passion however, was partying among a group of pleasure seekers known as "men who turn night into day" and writing about Roman society. After serving on consul he was invted by Emperor Nero to be an advisor, which landed him the role as "director of elegance" (or arbiter elegantiae). Unfortunately this made people jealous and the commander of the Praetorian Guard accused him of being involved in a plan to murder the Emperor and arrested Petronius. Being the rebel that he was, Petronius decided to not wait for his trial and execution, but instead wrote a letter to the Emperor about his (Nero's) orgies and affairs, and then cut his wrists. He convinced the guards to let him go since he was already dying, and he spent the day hosting a luxurious banquet while slowly bleeding to death.
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    his work Saryricon,Satyricon, a satirical
    {http://i.huffpost.com/gadgets/slideshows/321505/slide_321505_3018771_free.jpg} TRIMALCHIO'S DINNER PARTY from the “Satyricon”
    "...her body gleaming in the slow shifting from one to another of such formally erotic attitudes and gestures as a Beardsley of the time of
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    6:59 am

Monday, May 22

  1. page Philoprogenitive edited 1, Having many offspring. 2. Expressing love toward one's offspring. _ Say it to Father will y…
    1, Having many offspring.
    2. Expressing love toward one's offspring.
    _
    Say it to Father will you I will am my fathers Progenitive I invented him created I him Say it to him it will not be for he will say I was not and then you and I since philoprogenitive TSAF (122)
    Quentin's imagined conversation with Caddy challenges their paternity. Quentin imagines, "I am my fathers [son]" will be refuted with "he will say I was not." Quentin fantasizes that he is not Jason's son because then he and Caddy would not be siblings and his incestual obsession with her would be acceptable. The use of philoprogenitive in this section may refer to his and Caddy's ability to have offspring together (particularly the child which Caddy is already pregnant with) or it may refer to Jason Comspon expressing love toward his own children (Quentin, who "did not" commit incest, and Caddy, who destroyed her father's name with her pre-marital pregnancy).
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    9:03 am
  2. page Progenitive edited (adj) Having the ability to produce offspring. __ Say it to Father will you I will am my father…
    (adj) Having the ability to produce offspring.
    __
    Say it to Father will you I will am my fathers Progenitive I invented him created I him Say it to him it will not be for he will say I was not and then you and I since philoprogenitive TSAF (122)
    Quentin's imagined conversation with Caddy challenges their paternity. Quentin imagines, "I am my fathers [son]" will be refuted with "he will say I was not." Quentin fantasizes that he is not Jason's son because then he and Caddy would not be siblings and his incestual obsession with her would be acceptable.
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    9:00 am
  3. page Philoprogenitive edited 1, Having many offspring. 2. Expressing love toward one's offspring. _ Say it to Father will y…
    1, Having many offspring.
    2. Expressing love toward one's offspring.
    _
    Say it to Father will you I will am my fathers Progenitive I invented him created I him Say it to him it will not be for he will say I was not and then you and I since philoprogenitive TSAF (122)
    Quentin's imagined conversation with Caddy challenges their paternity. Quentin imagines, "I am my fathers [son]" will be refuted with "he will say I was not." Quentin fantasizes that he is not Jason's son because then he and Caddy would not be siblings and his incestual obsession with her would be acceptable. The use of philoprogenitive in this section may refer to his and Caddy's ability to have offspring together (particularly the child which Caddy is already pregnant with) or it may refer to Jason Comspon expressing love toward his own children (Quentin, who "did not" commit incest, and Caddy, who destroyed her father's name with her pre-marital pregnancy).
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    8:59 am
  4. page Progenitive edited Having (adj) Having the ability ... produce offspring. __ Say it to Father will you I will …
    Having(adj) Having the ability
    ...
    produce offspring.
    __

    Say it to Father will you I will am my fathers Progenitive I invented him created I him Say it to him it will not be for he will say I was not and then you and I since philoprogenitive TSAF (122)
    Quentin's imagined conversation with Caddy challenges their paternity. Quentin imagines, "I am my fathers [son]" will be refuted with "he will say I was not." Quentin fantasizes that he is not Jason's son because then he and Caddy would not be siblings and his incestual obsession with her would be acceptable.
    (view changes)
    8:55 am

Thursday, May 18

  1. page Cloisters edited ... The sensory elements apparent upon entering one of these cloistered spaces have significance a…
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    The sensory elements apparent upon entering one of these cloistered spaces have significance as well. These aspects are perhaps most apparent in Rosa's shuttered home. Upon his first visit to Rosa, Quentin observes "a dim hot airless room with the blinds all closed and fastened for forty-three summers" that "became latticed with yellow slashes full of dust motes which Quentin thought of as being flecks of the dead old dried paint itself blown inward from the scaling blinds as wind might have blown them" (Absalom 3). Quentin also observes the following of the cloistered space occupied by his mother Caroline, The Sound and the Fury's dramatic, reclusive, and possibly hypochondriac mother of the disintegrating Compson family who rarely leaves her sick room: "a face reproachful tearful an odor of camphor and of tears a voice weeping steadily and softly beyond the twilight door the twilight-colored smell of honeysuckle" (Fury 95). In the case of Light in August's Hightower, his own deteriorated physical state merges with the decaying atmosphere surrounding him, although he has become accustomed to the mustiness encircling him. These spaces exude the sufferings that their inhabitants have endured within and without them, making these hardships apparent to hopefully sympathetic visitors while being simultaneously hostile to these outsiders.
    Related to the spatial element of cloisters is the specter of approaching urbanization, specifically in the form of cities such as Memphis and New Orleans, characterized as places of sin and pleasure to which many Yoknapatawpha residents travel. As Irene Visser notes, Bunch fails to join his fellow workers when they travel to Memphis on the weekends to engage in seedy activities. Instead, he further rejects this encroaching citified existence through, in addition to his work at the mill, retreating even further from this menace by attending church in the countryside outside Jefferson on Sundays (279). Hightower's deceased wife, who spent much time in Memphis and then fell to her death from a building in the same city, perhaps contributed to Hightower's controversial decision to remain secluded within his home in Jefferson after the scandal of her death shakes the town.
    ...
    (Absalom 70).
    Philip
    Philip Weinstein connects
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    to their neighborneighbors Siphonsiba and
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    this display of energies, which
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    day (29).
    Although Christmas,

    Christmas,
    based on
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    sexual purity, and he has
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    effect marginalizing themselveshimself and his wife within their
    Despite Rosa's thrusting aside of Sutpen's shrewd control over those in his life, her concern does not appear to extend to fully include the slaves under his power. To Rosa, the hybridity of the world of Sutpen's Hundred, particularly as represented in Clytemnestra (Clytie), the daughter of Sutpen and one of his female slaves, is of a menacing nature, as made clear in the thoughts accompanying her interaction with Clytie on the grounds of Sutpen's Hundred after Henry murders Bon: she describes with seeming horror the "...hand on my white woman's flesh" (Absalom 111). She then meditates on the "touch and touch of that which is the citadel of the central I-Am's private own: not spirit, soul; the liquorish and ungirdled mind is anyone's to take in any darkened hallway of this earthly tenement" (Absalom 112; my emphasis). This scene makes clear the power imbalances troubling the practice of cloistering in Faulkner's world. Perhaps as a result of being cloistered herself by her own family, Rosa in turn attempts to cloister Clytie in an effort to bleach out her mixed racial background.
    Connected to the above discussions of spatiality and purity is the gaze, in all of its iterations, including the social gaze, the male gaze, and so on, which makes its presence known throughout Yoknapatawpha County. Ruzicka zeroes in on the Yoknapatawpha County Courthouse as the focal point of the county, both in a spatial sense and due to the fact that it is "the embodiment of its [Jefferson's] communal order" (55). In this sense, the courthouse can be thought of as the epitome of the panopticon. This figure of the courthouse overshadows multiple scenes in which Mrs. Hines and Christmas are present after he has been arrested for Joanna Burden's murder. More particularly, Christmas is subject to the "discriminatory gaze," as Irene Visser refers to it, as employed by Christmas's own grandfather, who, in disguise as a janitor at Christmas's orphanage, plants the seed in his extremely young mind that there is something different about him, sending him on the road to seclusion (Visser 279).
    This preponderance of cloistered figures brings to light an interesting paradox of cloistered, feminized men and roaming, masculinized women in Faulkner's world. Although they restrict themselves spatially and otherwise, Faulkner's cloistered men often become more expansive in terms of gender expression as they retreat to the domestic sphere, thus increasing their marginality on multiple levels. Similarly to other cloistered men in Faulkner's world, Go Down, Moses's Uncle Buddy engages in the necessary homemaking activities for his household. There are numerous mentions of Buddy cooking during "Was," such as when Buck orders him to revert to these homemaker duties after they return to the scene of the loose fox in their home: "'Damn the fox,' Uncle Buck said. 'Go on and start breakfast'" (29). Hightower is feminized in the sense that he acts as a midwife of sorts for multiple women in childbirth, but he also retains aggressively masculine characteristics such as his obsession with the violence associated with his grandfather's death during the Civil War. Even as he is dying while looking out of the window through which he routinely gazed at the outside world, "it seems to him that he still hears them: the wild bugles and the clashing sabres and they dying thunder of hooves" (493).
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    feminization of men,men in the
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    turn toward domesticity,domesticity that can
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    home, a dwelling"dwelling," she "is
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    structures she inhabitsinhabits" (Ruzicka 113).
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    cross-dressing soldiering, also eventually returns to a highly performative
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    Furthermore, perhaps some women avoid
    As hinted at above, the borders separating these cloisters from the outside world are permeable. Whether by force or through their own choice, cloistral border interactions occur, with varying results. As Erin Pearson notes regarding the various hidden secrets and people dwelling within Absalom, Absalom!, "the act of hiding assumes the shape of hiding itself" (Pearson 341). This notion of the paradox of hiding is useful for thinking about the degree to which Faulkner's cloistered characters are able to successfully enshroud themselves from the world around them. In Pearson's way of thinking, hiding something (or oneself) only serves to highlight the absence of that thing or person in regular society.
    ...
    to deliver Lena Grove'sLena's baby. His
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    the outside world:world as well: "Without a
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    if dead, as indicated by
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    her speech to various tomblike
    Cloistral departures initiated willingly can have positive results. As Anne Hirsch Moffitt notes, for instance, although Yoknapatawpha County itself can in some ways be considered a cloister containing those living within it and repudiate the arrival of modernity from the north, this supposed cloister is penetrable (21-22). On the level of the individual, Moffitt notes that Rosa, in a reveal of her complex cloistral existence, exemplifies such a penetration as she attempts to form a bridge between the rural south and the urban north, specifically Quentin's college environment in Cambridge, when transferring the story of Sutpen (and herself) to Quentin (21-22).
    The attempts of various individuals in Faulkner's universe to achieve their own form of apotheosis or impose such on others combine to create a complex web of marginalization, freedom, and absence. These interactions, among people, spaces, and cloistral borders, are informed by and subject to the racism, sexism, and other forms of subjugation that Faulkner chronicles in his works, underscoring the complicated power structures within which Faulkner's characters live.
    Works Cited
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    International, 1990.
    ---. Go Down, Moses. Vintage International, 1990.
    ---. Light in August. Vintage International, 1990.
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    2:15 pm

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